desks-set-up-in-sports-hall-for-exams_t20_v216v3

Share via Facebook or Email

If you haven’t already done so, this week is an ideal time to send colleges your standardized test scores if you’re applying Early Action or Early Decision. Some schools (we’re looking at you, Michigan) are real sticklers for everything getting in by Nov. 1, so we recommend giving the testing agency at least two weeks to send the scores.

Questions? We’ve got answers. Below are some of the questions we’re asked most often at this time of year.

How do I send my test scores?

You must send your test scores directly from the testing agency — either the ACT or the College Board — to the colleges to which you’re applying. Once you log in, you’ll see “Send My Scores,” and can follow the steps they provide.

But I thought my high school sends them?

Your high school will send your transcript and your letters of recommendation. You are responsible for sending your official score reports.

What if I self-report on the Common App? Is that enough?

More schools, like Colgate and Stanford, are starting to accept self-reported scores as official for the review process. However, most still need your official score report to process your application.

How does superscoring work?

More and more schools are superscoring both the SAT and the ACT. It is the colleges that will do the superscoring; your job is to send them every test date that has a subsection that contributes to your superscore. In other words, if you took the ACT in April and June, and in April did higher in Reading and Math, and in June did higher in English and Science, you will need to send BOTH tests to your colleges in order for them to create your superscore.

What if I’m taking the October ACT or November SAT? Can I use those tests for early deadlines?

Many schools will accept these tests as part of early applications, even though results come in after the deadlines. However, you will likely have to add your early schools as score recipients when you sit for the exam, which means they’ll get the scores at the same time you do and there won’t be a delay. Make sure to double-check the policies of your colleges of interest to confirm if they will take these exams, and, if so, if they need to be sent to them directly.

desks-set-up-in-sports-hall-for-exams_t20_v216v3

Sending Test Scores to Colleges

Share via Facebook or Email